Archive for the ‘video production’ Category

New KET PBS LearningMedia Classroom Video Production Course

Thursday, February 4th, 2016 by Jeff Gray, KET

KETPBSLM_classroomvideo1There’s a new KET-built online class for teachers at Kentucky PBS LearningMedia:
LEAD 1171 Classroom Video Production

Course Description:

This introductory course provides teachers with the tools to facilitate student video production across the curriculum and at all levels. Participants will learn about video production techniques, basic equipment needs, production roles, and careers. Throughout the course, fellow teachers and the KET production team will guide and inspire participants to initiate student video projects.

Note: This is a self-paced course accessible for one year after enrollment, and not eligible for graduate credit.

Subject Area: Leadership

Grade Level: Kindergarten-12th

Hours: 3.0

Cost: Free

Elkhorn Middle School, Scott County, at KET for Video Production

Wednesday, December 16th, 2015 by Jeff Gray, KET

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Kate Osterloh, LMS/STC/Drama Club Sponsor for Elkhorn Middle School, Scott County, brought students to KET’s Media Lab for a workshop in basic video production and editing. Here are students from the group making a greenscreen/chromakey special effect video.

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Birds have now replaced the greenscreen background in the video activity, demonstrating how easy it is to introduce a variety of background images and videos into a classroom video project. Students can place themselves and their teammates into any scenario they choose to enhance classroom projects from history to the arts.

If you’d like to bring public, private, or homeschool students to KET for a free
KET Media Lab multimedia production workshop and a tour of KET, please contact
Jeff Gray, KET Education Division.

Newtek Tricaster Mini: New Video Production Studio in a Box

Monday, October 27th, 2014 by Jeff Gray, KET

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All-in-one video production “appliances” that include multiple camera video and audio switching, titling, special effects, and more for live and recorded production projects have been in use for  some years in Kentucky schools like Bath County High, and Eastside Technical School, Lexington. Schools who can afford Newtek Tricasters, which start around $5,000, or similar switching gear like the Roland line of a/v mixers, enjoy making live video production projects with crews of students who excitedly play-out the roles of professional video production staff. Together, they plan, write, and produce video news and special events programming that requires teamwork and a lot of group and individual skill building that culminates in shared products that prepare students for real-world jobs, and the use of multimedia in further studies.

Roland offers the VR50-HD ($7,495) and some less expensive items like the VR-3EX ($2,195) and the V4-EX ($1,995).  Check the technical specifications for comparison of models and features among the manufacturers’ units.

For schools, a big thing that’s been missing from the Tricaster line has been HDMI inputs for commonly-used cameras and other devices. With the arrival of the Tricaster  Mini, schools now have more options to consider because the new Tricaster Mini has HDMI inputs, a PC input, analog audio inputs, a DDR for video segment and graphics playback, program video recording, program streaming out, and much more, including the virtual set feature with advanced chromakeying for greenscreen effects. It’s features and specifications are encouraging.

There are two Tricaster Mini models: the base HD-4 model Tricaster Mini, at $5,995, records 15 hours of 1080p video to an internal 750GB hard drive.  Their more expensive HD-4i model sells for $7,995. It includes a monitor and records 45 hours of video to an internal 1.5TB hard drive and includes a side-mounted video monitor.  They’re not cheap, but their many features do the work that would normally require several individual component pieces of equipment which could cost much more if purchased separately.

One caveat of all-in-one studio production devices that scares some is that if a unit goes down it may have to be shipped back to Newtek for repair, halting production until the unit is returned. Tricasters we’ve seen in Kentucky schools seem to have been in service for a while and we’ve not heard any warnings if that helps. An alternative is to use an a/v switcher such as the ATEM TV-Studio by Black Magic Design ($995.00), along with other component equipment for equivalent video production. That way might let you carry on in case of individual component failure, depending on what breaks and when.

Here’s an equipment connection diagram from the Newtek site:

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And here are links to Tricaster Mini evaluations and reviews:

We’re looking forward to seeing what schools do with this new video production tool. As a one-box video production studio, it could make beginning a school video production a lot easier, and its advanced features could expand existing programs.

(Note: This new product overview is offered as an information service only and does not constitute an endorsement by KET.)


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